Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign Social Media Toolkit

Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign, 2021

Wildfire can threaten Nevada communities any time of the year. Because of that, Nevada’s local, state, and federal firefighting agencies, wildfire-prone communities, and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension have extended our Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign (NWAC) from May – October. During this campaign, we hope to empower Nevadans to prepare for wildfire.

This year, we have created the “Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign Social Media Toolkit” below. In the toolkit, you’ll find the 2021 NWAC graphic, as well as social media content on different topics related to wildfire awareness and preparedness organized according to our suggested calendar.

If you have any questions about the social media toolkit please contact Megan Kay, Outreach Coordinator for the Living With Fire program at [email protected]


Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign Graphics

Alt-text for graphics: Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says, “Is your home ignition resistant?”

  • Facebook Photo:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,
  • Facebook Cover:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,
  • Twitter Header:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,

Lake Tahoe Wildfire Awareness Campaign Graphics

  • Facebook Photo:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,
  • Facebook Cover:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,
  • Twitter Header:
    Illustration of embers flying toward a house with text that says,

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Illustration of Embers abbroaching a house with the text,

Alt-Text: Illustration of Embers approaching a house with the text, “Is your home ignition resistant”

Facebook: Wildfire can threaten Nevadan communities any time of the year. Because of that, Nevada’s local, state, and federal firefighting agencies, wildfire-prone communities and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension have extended our Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign from May – October. During this campaign, we hope to empower Nevadans to prepare for wildfire. To learn more, visit LivingWithFire.com.

Is your home ignition resistant? 60-90% of homes lost during wildfires are ignited by burning embers that can travel as far as a mile ahead of a fire. Engaging in pre-fire activities such as creating defensible space, and hardening homes to withstand wildfire, can help create ignition resistant homes and communities that are less vulnerable to embers.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety #FireAdapted

Visit livingwithfire.com for more information

Twitter: Wildfire can threaten Nevada communities any time of the year. Therefore, we have extended our Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign from May – October. Learn more at https://www.livingwithfire.com/webinars/

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #NWAC #Wildfire #RedyForWildfire #FireAdapted


Illustration of the different defensible space zones around a home with the text

Alt-Text: Illustration of the different defensible space zones around a home with the text “Defensible space, Know the zones.”

Facebook: The Defensible Space Zone is the area around your house where vegetation has been managed to reduce the threat of wildfire and to allow firefighters to safely defend the property. Creating effective defensible space means understanding the different zones around the home.

THE EMBER-RESISTANT ZONE (Zone 0) |The zone within 5 feet of your home has many different names (e.g., the noncombustible zone, the immediate zone, the zero zone), but the objective is generally the same—to reduce the vulnerability of the home to embers. This area should always be kept clean of any dead vegetation and debris, and fire-resistant materials, such as gravel, concrete or brick should be emphasized.

THE LEAN, CLEAN, AND GREEN ZONE (Zone 1) | 5–30 feet from the home: To reduce the risk of fire spreading from plant life to the home, limit the amount of vegetation in this zone. Keep this area free of dead vegetation and debris, and make sure all plants are green and well-irrigated.

THE REDUCED FUEL ZONE (Zone 2) | The objective of this zone is to reduce fire spread and restrict fire movement into the crowns of trees or shrubs. Here, combustible items, like low-lying tree branches and dead plants should be removed.

Consult the Living With Fire Home Retrofit Guide linked below for information on creating defensible space and preparing your home for wildfire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://bit.ly/3wWEMYJ

Twitter: The Defensible Space Zone is the area around your house where vegetation has been managed to reduce the threat of wildfire and to allow firefighters to safely defend the property. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #ReadyForWildfire

https://bit.ly/3wWEMYJ


Illustration of the space between a home and vegetation, with a fire approaching and text that says,

Alt-Text: Illustration of the space between a home and vegetation, with a fire approaching and text that says, “Defensible Space, Create separation between home and flammable vegetation.”

Facebook: Flammable vegetation close to homes poses a significant wildfire threat. Creating and maintaining defensible space can reduce that threat. Learn more about defensible space in our guide, “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

bit.ly/FireAdaptedCommunitiesNevada

Twitter: To protect your property during a wildfire, create defensible space by separating plants from your house. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

bit.ly/FireAdaptedCommunitiesNevada

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Illustration of how fire moves from low lying vegetation into the canopy of a tree with the text,

Alt-text: Illustration of how fire moves from low-lying vegetation into the canopy of a tree with the text, “Defensible Space, Eliminate ladder fuels.”

Facebook: Low-lying branches and vegetation that can help carry flames into the tops of trees and shrubs. These ladder fuels can lead to the quicker spread of wildfire. Eliminating ladder fuels around your property can prevent that spread and protect your home. Learn more about them in the publications below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Ladder fuels can spread wildfire. Eliminate ladder fuels in and around your property to reduce the risk of wildfire. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/


Photo of pink flowers and text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of pink flowers and text that says, “Defensible Space, choose plants with high moisture content.”

Facebook: For home landscaping, select less flammable, high-moisture plants. These plants can help slow the spread of wildfire. When selecting plants, choose smaller plants and remember to keep them well-groomed and healthy. Learn more in our Choosing the Right Plants for Northern Nevada’s High Fire Hazard Areas guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://bit.ly/3cZU4T5

Twitter:High-moisture plants are less likely to spread wildfire. Select smaller, less flammable plants for home landscaping, and keep them well-groomed and healthy. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://bit.ly/3cZU4T5


Illustration of plants before and after thining with text that says

Alt-text: Illustration of plants before and after thining with text that says “Defensible Space, create separation between plants.”

Facebook: Dense groups of trees and shrubs pose a significant wildfire threat. Thinning dense plant life to create more space between them can increase the effectiveness of defensible space. Learn more about defensible space and preparing your home and family for wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Dense groups of trees and shrubs pose a significant wildfire threat. Thin dense plant life to create more space between them. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

 

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Illustration of the recommended 10 ft separation between tree canopies and the house with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of the recommended 10 ft separation between tree canopies and the house with text that says, “Defensible Space, Create separation between trees.”

Facebook: Fire can transfer from treetop to treetop. In your defensible space, separate tree canopies by at least 10 feet. The tops of mature trees should not be within 10 feet of the house. Learn more about creating defensible space and other ways to protect your family, home, and property below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Fire can transfer from treetop to treetop. Separate treetops by cutting down unhealthy trees. Learn more about defensible space below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/


Photo of a tree planted at least 30 feet away a house with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a tree planted at least 30 feet away a house with text that says, “Defensible Space, If trees are desired within 30 feet form the home choose deciduous types.”

Facebook: There are no “fireproof” plants, however some are more of a fire hazard than others. Many evergreen woody plants, such as juniper, pine, and arborvitae, contain flammable chemicals that cause them to burn intensely when ignited. Instead of planting evergreens, try planting deciduous trees whose leaves fall off to reduce the wildfire risk. Learn more about preparing and protecting your property from wildfire at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/2007-3335.pdf

Twitter: There are no “fireproof” plants, however, some are more of a fire hazard than others. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/2007-3335.pdf


Photo of a woman moving dead vegetation with a wheelbarrow and test that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a woman moving dead vegetation with a wheelbarrow and text that says, “Defensible Space, remove dead vegetation.”

Facebook: To reduce the risk of wildfire, remove all dead vegetation near buildings, houses and structures. Learn more about preparing you, your family, property and community for wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: To reduce the risk of wildfire, remove all dead vegetation near structures. Learn more about preparing for wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

 

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Photo of plants being watered with the text,

Alt-text: Photo of plants being watered with the text, “Defensible Space, Keep plants well irrigated.”

Facebook: Make sure plants within 5 feet your home are healthy, well-irrigated, and have a high moisture content. Plants that fit these criteria are more resistant to wildfire. Learn more about protecting you and your communities below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Make sure plants within 5 feet of your home are healthy, well-irrigated, and have high moisture content. Learn more about preparing for wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/


Photo of a juniper plant with the text,

Alt-text: Photo of a juniper plant with the text, “Defensible Space, Junipers are highly flammable. Keep them from at least 30 feet from homes.”

Facebook: Firefighters often refer to ornamental junipers as little green gas cans. They contain flammable chemicals, and when ignited can burn intensely. Keep these “little green gas cans” at least 30 feet from the house or replace them with low-growing deciduous shrubs, herbaceous flowers, rock mulches and hard surfaces. Learn more about choosing the right plants in high fire hazard areas in the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Firefighters often call ornamental junipers “little green gas cans.” Keep these plants at least 30 feet away from your home. Learn more about defensible space below.

#LivingWithFire #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire

https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/


Photo of rock ground cover next to a house with the text,

Alt-text: Photo of rock ground cover next to a house with the text, “Defensible Space, Use a non-combustible ground cover.”

Facebook: Mulch plays an important role in residential landscapes. Unfortunately, many mulches are combustible, a major drawback when used in high fire hazard areas. Within five feet of the home, use noncombustible rock, gravel, concrete and pavers. Also, ignition-resistant plant materials, such as irrigated, well-maintained lawn and flowers can be used. Learn more about the combustibility of landscape mulches at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=2364

Twitter: Many mulches are combustible. Within five feet of the home, use non-combustible ground covers. Learn more at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=2364

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Photo of a person throwing dead vegetation on a pile with the text,

Alt-text: Photo of a person throwing dead vegetation on a pile with the text, “Defensible Space, Disposing of green waste.”

Facebook: Creating and maintaining defensible space can result in a large amount of “green waste” consisting of leaves, weeds, branches, and shrubs that need disposing of. Residents can dispose of this waste in a variety of ways, including taking advantage of free green waste collection events in their communities. Often, fire agencies provide these opportunities throughout the year. Follow your local fire agencies to learn more.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Creating defensible space can result in large amounts of green waste that needs to be disposed of. Take advantage of free green waste collection events in your community. Follow your local fire agencies for more information.

#LivingWithFire #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire

 


Photo of a cheatgrass plant and text that says,

Facebook: Dry cheatgrass is probably the most easily ignitable vegetation on Nevada’s rangelands. If started on a windy day, a cheatgrass fire can produce flames in excess of 8 feet and travel 4½ mph. To reduce the risk of wildfire to your home, and property, remove all cheatgrass within 30 feet of your home, and incorporate an integrated management program to control the plant. Learn about cheatgrass at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=23564

Twitter: Dry cheatgrass is probably the most easily ignitable vegetation on Nevada’s rangelands. Learn how to manage cheatgrass to reduce the wildfire risk below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire

https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=2364


Infographic of a shooting target on fire with the text,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Infographic of a shooting target on fire with the text, “Take Aim, Prevent Wildfires.” Other text in the description below.

Facebook: Careless shooting can cause fires. If it’s dry, hot and windy; save your ammo.

  • Avoid shooting into rocks or metal objects and place targets in areas that are free of vegetation.
  • Always have water, a shovel and a fire extinguisher ready in case a fire starts.
  • Clean up all your targets and shells when you’re finished shooting and pack them out.
  • Exploding targets, incendiary rounds and tracer ammunition are illegal on all public lands. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Careless shooting can cause fires. If it’s dry, hot and windy; save your ammo. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

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Photo of a cars on a highway in the distance and grass in the foregroud with text that says,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Photo of cars on a highway in the distance and grass in the foreground with text that says, “Unsecured trailer chains spark wildfires.One less community at risk. One less spark, one less wildfire.”

Facebook: Motorists are responsible for many of the wildfires sparked along the roadways. Nearly all of these fires could be prevented by following these safety rules. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

  • Secure safety chains on all towing equipment.
  • Use appropriate safety pins and hitchball to secure chains.
  • Ensure your vehicle is properly maintained:
    • Proper tire pressure can prevent a blowout, exposed wheel rims will throw sparks.
    • Properly maintain brakes, brakes worn too thin can cause metal to metal contact which can cause sparks.
    • Get regular tune-ups to prevent a clogged exhaust system which can launch hot particles into vegetation.
  • Avoid parking or driving in dry grass and brush. Hot exhaust pipes and mufflers can start a fire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Motorists are responsible for many of the wildfires sparked along the roadways. Nearly all of these fires could be prevented by following safety rules. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Photo of a cow sitting in a field with the text,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Photo of a cow sitting in a field with the text, “One less habitat loss. Extinguish your campfire completely” and photos illustrating how to drown the campfire, stir it and feel for heat.

Facebook: Campfires that aren’t properly maintained and extinguished can cause wildfires. Be responsible for your campfire. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

  • Never leave your campfire unattended.
  • Always keep a shovel and bucket nearby.
  • When extinguishing your campfire, use the drown, stir, feel method: drown the fire with water and stir around the fire area with your shovel to wet any remaining embers and ash. Shovel dirt onto the campfire site and mix and smother thoroughly. Feel the area with the back of your hand to make sure all the heat is out. Repeat this process until you are sure there is no more heat left

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Campfires that aren’t properly maintained and extinguished can cause wildfires. Be responsible for your campfire. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Illustration of fireworks setting grass on fire with test that says,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Illustration of fireworks setting grass on fire with test that says, “Exploding targets and fireworks are prohibited on public lands. Don’t be “That Person.”

Facebook: Be safe this fireworks season, and remember: Exploding targets and fireworks are prohibited on public lands. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Be safe this fireworks season, and remember: Exploding targets and fireworks are prohibited on public lands. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

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Photo of a child playing in the desert with the text,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Photo of a child playing in the desert with the text, “Careless off-roading sparks fires. One less threat to future generations. One Less Spark, One Less Wildfire.”

Facebook: Help prevent off-roading fires. Following these easy steps could prevent the disastrous burning of Nevada’s public lands. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

  1. Don’t park on dry grass.
  2. Equip off-road vehicles with spark arrestors.
  3. Secure trailer safety chains.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Help prevent off-roading fires:
1. Don’t park on dry grass.
2. Equip off-road vehicles with spark arrestors.
3. Secure trailer safety chains.

Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Photo of a Wildfire Evacuation Checklist with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a Wildfire Evacuation Checklist with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Evacuation checklist.”

Facebook: Wildfire evacuations are stressful events, and often residents don’t have much notice before it’s time to leave their homes. Prepare now for evacuation by packing a go-bag and using our evacuation checklist. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2007_90.pdf

Twitter: Wildfire evacuations are stressful events, and often residents don’t have much notice before it’s time to leave their homes. Use an evacuation checklist to prepare now.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire #ReadyForWildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2007_90.pdf


Photo of a family reviewing their home evacuation guide with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a family reviewing their home evacuation guide with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Know your escape route.”

Facebook: Know your neighborhood! Plan an escape route for when wildfire hits your community. Make sure to plan a secondary route in case the primary route is blocked. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

Twitter: Know your neighborhood! Plan an escape route for when wildfire hits your community. Make sure to plan a secondary route in case the primary route is blocked. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire #ReadyForWildfire
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

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Photo of a person in a wheelchair with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a person in a wheelchair with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Evacuating vulnerable populations.”

Facebook: When preparing for wildfire, think about those in your community who need special consideration during an evacuation. Learn how to prepare for a wildfire evacuation. Learn more below:

  • Contact your local emergency manager to learn about emergency services for individuals with disabilities.
  • Create a support network of people who can assist with evacuation.
  • Pack a go-bag with 3-5 days’ worth of essentials including medications and medical equipment.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

Twitter: When preparing for wildfire, think about those in your community who need special consideration during an evacuation. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/


Photo of a dog in a car with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a dog in a car with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Animal evacuation.”

Facebook: Many people living in high fire hazard areas have pets and livestock. Prepare to evacuate your animals before wildfire happens. Pack a go-bag with everything your animals might need and make sure that you can safely transport them. Consult our guide “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” to learn more.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf

Twitter: Many people living in high fire hazard areas have pets and livestock. Prepare to evacuate your animals before wildfire happens. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf


Photo of a red evacuation go bag with text that says, Prepare for Wildfire, Pack an evacuation go-bag.

Alt-text: Photo of a red evacuation go bag with text that says, Prepare for Wildfire, Pack an evacuation go-bag.”

Facebook: A go-bag should be easily accessible and filled with the items you need to quickly and safely evacuate your home. It needs to have enough supplies to last at least three days but should have enough to last seven days. Find out what goes into a go-bag and how to put one together in our “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf

Twitter: A go-bag is easily accessible and helps you quickly and safely evacuate during a wildfire. Learn how to put one together in the “Fire Adapted Communities Guide” linked below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire #ReadyForWildfire

https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf

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Photo of someone filling out a home inventory form with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of someone filling out a home inventory form with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Make a home inventory.”

Facebook: When evacuating from a wildfire you only have time to bring the essentials, leaving your valued possessions behind. While nothing can replace these possessions, a regularly updated home inventory can ensure you are reimbursed for damaged and destroyed property. Download the free home inventory template and learn more about insuring your property at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.insureuonline.org/insureu_special_disaster.htm

Twitter: A regularly updated home inventory can help you be reimbursed for property damaged or destroyed during a wildfire. Download a template and learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

https://www.insureuonline.org/insureu_special_disaster.htm


Facebook: Create a family emergency communication plan. It should include local emergency personnel, family contact information as well as information for work and school. Learn more about family emergency communication plans in FEMA’s step-by-step guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/2021-02/family-emergency-communication-plan.pdf

Twitter: Create a family emergency communication plan. It should include contact info. for, emergency services, family members, work & school. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire

https://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/2021-02/family-emergency-communication-plan.pdf


Photo of a person signing up for code red notifications on their cell phone with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a person signing up for code red notifications on their cell phone with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Sign-up for emergency notifications.”

Facebook: Emergency notifications keep you updated in the face of disaster. Sign up for emergency notifications and regional alerts, like the CodeRED system, with your local authorities. Click the link below to learn about emergency notifications in Nevada.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=3336

Twitter: Emergency notifications keep you updated in the face of disaster. Click the link below to sign up for emergency notifications in Nevada.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=3336

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Infographic explaining what a red flag warning is and how to act when one is in place, in order to prevent wildfires. More information in description below.

Facebook: A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are happening. Weather conditions can consist of strong winds, low humidity, warm temperatures, or a combination of such. All can contribute to extreme fire behavior. Be aware of the fire warnings in your area and always follow the instructions provided by local emergency officials. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fire2/main.php

Twitter: Critical fire weather conditions increase the risk of a wildfire and can lead to a Red Flag Warning. Make sure to follow all instructions given by local emergency officials.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #NWAC #Wildfire #RedFlagWarning
https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fire2/main.php


Photo of a group of people gathered at a soccer field, with dark wildfire smoke in the background and text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a group of people gathered at a soccer field, with dark wildfire smoke in the background and text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Identify safe areas to evacuate.”

Facebook: During a wildfire, make sure you know about a safe nearby area to evacuate to. Large grass fields and empty parking lots are good options. Learn more about evacuation and staying safe during a wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

Twitter: During a wildfire, make sure you know about a safe nearby area to evacuate to. Large grass fields and empty parking lots are good options. Learn more below

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/


Photo of a street sign with the text,

Alt-text: Photo of a street sign with the text, “Prepare for Wildfire, Maintain street signs.”

Facebook: Street signs help emergency responders navigate during a wildfire. Make sure signs in your neighborhood are posted at each intersection, made of reflective material, and have characters that are at least 4 inches tall. Learn more in the guide “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pd

Twitter: Street signs help emergency responders navigate during a wildfire. Large, reflective signs should be posted at each intersection in your neighborhood. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire #ReadyForWildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pd

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Photo of a house with an unobstructed driveway and text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a house with an unobstructed driveway and text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Keep your driveway clear.”

Facebook: Keep your driveway clear so emergency responders have access to your property. Remove flammable vegetation 10 feet or more around and obstructions above up to 13 and a half feet above the driveway. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/

Twitter: Keep your driveway clear so emergency responders have access to your property. Remove flammable vegetation and other obstructions. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #NWAC #Wildfire #ReadyForWildfire
https://www.livingwithfire.com/resources/publications/


Graphic of an air quality meter with text that says,

 

Alt-text: Graphic of an air quality meter with text that says, “Living with Wildfire Smoke, Check air quality often.”

Facebook: During a wildfire, smoke affects air quality. Before going out, make sure to check the air quality often. Consult airnow.gov  and fire.airnow.gov for real-time, air quality updates. Learn more about what to do during a wildfire at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.epa.gov/smoke-ready-toolbox-wildfires

Twitter: During a wildfire, smoke affects air quality. Before going out, make sure to check the air quality often. Consult airnow.gov and fire.airnow.gov for real-time, air quality updates.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Photo of a clear blue sky with test that says,

 

Alt-text: Photo of a clear blue sky with text that says, “Living With Wildfire Smoke, Take advantage of clean air when you can.”

Facebook: Unhealthy/poor air quality is common during a wildfire. With the risk and high possibility of a wildfire, make sure to get out and enjoy clean air whenever possible. When air quality prevents outdoor activities, make sure you have plans to keep yourself busy indoors. Learn more about preparing for wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.epa.gov/smoke-ready-toolbox-wildfires

Twitter: Unhealthy/poor air quality is common during a wildfire. With the risk of wildfire, make sure to get out and enjoy clean air whenever possible. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.epa.gov/smoke-ready-toolbox-wildfires

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Facebook: Using the right air filter in your home can help improve your indoor air quality during a wildfire. Consult the guide below to learn more about keeping your indoor air clean.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/3mj67z9

Twitter: Using the right air filter in your home can help improve your indoor air quality during a wildfire. Consult the guide below to learn more about keeping your indoor air clean.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke#NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/3mj67z9


Photo of an indoor air purifier with text that says,

 

Alt-text: Photo of an indoor air purifier with text that says, “Living With Wildfire Smoke, Create a clean room with an indoor air purifier.”

Facebook: Create a “clean room” in your home. Choose a room with no fireplace and with few windows and doors. Use a portable air cleaner or purifier in the room. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/3c7Cs8L

Twitter: Create a “clean room” in your home. Choose a room with no fireplace and with few windows and doors. Use a portable air cleaner or purifier in the room. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/3c7Cs8L


Facebook: Living with wildfire is challenging both physically and mentally. Find activities to keep you and your family happy and healthy indoors. The University of Nevada, Reno Extensions Healthy Kids, Early Start program can help below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL23CD411FDF0E0220

Twitter: Living with wildfire is challenging both physically and mentally. Find activities to keep you and your family happy and healthy indoors. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL23CD411FDF0E0220

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Facebook: Smoke is made up of gases and small unburnt particles of burned vegetation, buildings and other material. When breathed in, these particles can travel deep into your lungs and even find their way into your bloodstream, leading to potentially serious health risks. Learn more about smoke and how to stay safe and healthy during wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm

Twitter: Smoke is made up of gases and small unburnt particles from burned material. Breathing smoke in can is a serious health risk. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm


Photo of a dog on a leash outdoors with text that says,

 

Alt-text: Photo of a dog on a leash outdoors with text that says, “Living With Wildfire Smoke, Protect your pets from wildfire smoke.”

Facebook: If you can feel the effects of wildfire smoke, then your pets probably can too! Protect your pets from wildfire smoke. When smoke is present, keep animals indoors as much as you can and call your veterinarian if they start exhibiting signs such as coughing, red eyes, fatigue, or trouble breathing. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety #WildfireSmoke
https://www.airnow.gov/sites/default/files/2019-03/protect-your-pets-from-wildfire-smoke.pdf

Twitter: If you can feel the effects of wildfire smoke, then your pets probably can too! Learn how to protect our pets from wildfire smoke below.

#LivingWithFire #WildfireSmoke #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.airnow.gov/sites/default/files/2019-03/protect-your-pets-from-wildfire-smoke.pdf


FAcebook: Strong winds can move wildfire smoke from an area on fire to communities otherwise unaffected, causing unhealthy/poor air quality and extending the health risks of wildfire. Learn more about smoke and how it travels below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.iqair.com/us/lp/blog/wildfire/wildfire-smoke-travels-farther-you-think

Twitter: Strong winds move wildfire smoke to communities otherwise unaffected, causing unhealthy/poor air quality and extending the health risks of wildfire. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #Smoke #NWAC
https://www.iqair.com/us/lp/blog/wildfire/wildfire-smoke-travels-farther-you-think

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Facebook: 60-90% of homes lost during wildfires are ignited by burning embers. Reducing the vulnerability of your home to embers will decrease the chance of ignition, protecting your home and your neighborhood. Learn more in the Living With Fire Be Ember Aware Guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/1510_2005_89.pdf

Twitter: 60-90% of home loss during a wildfire is due to the spread of embers. Reducing the vulnerability of your home to embers will decrease the chance of ignition. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/1510_2005_89.pdf


Illustration of an attic vent with text that says.

Alt-text: Illustration of an attic vent with text that says. “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Screen vents with at least 1/8-inch wire mesh.”

Facebook: Screens over vents can reduce the size and number of embers that pass through, reducing the risk of your house catching fire. Vents should be covered by, at a minimum, ⅛-inch noncombustible, corrosion-resistant metal mesh screening. Learn more about preparing your home for wildfire in the Living With Fire Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Screening vents with at least a ⅛-inch noncombustible screen can reduce the flow of embers into your house, reducing the risk of it catching on fire during a wildfire.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Photo of a roofing professional on a roof with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a roofing professional on a roof with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Replace wood shake shingles with Class A roof.”

Facebook: A wood-shake roof is similar to having hundreds of pounds of dried kindling on your home. Replace wood shake and shingle roofs with a Class A roof made of materials including asphalt fiberglass composition materials, clay and cement tiles, and some metals. Learn more in the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Make your roof fire-safe to reduce its vulnerability during a wildfire. Learn more in the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

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Photo of a woman removing dead vegetation from a roof with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a woman removing dead vegetation from a roof with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Remove dead vegetation and debris.”

Facebook: Reduce the vulnerability of your house during a wildfire. Remove dead vegetation and other debris on the roof, in the rain gutters, near fences, and other areas in the zone up to 30 feet from your house. Learn more in the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Remove debris near and around your home to reduce its vulnerability during a wildfire. Learn more in the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Illustration of a roof opening with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of a roof opening with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Block openings between roofing materials.”

Facebook: Spacing between roofing materials and the roof deck such as barrel tiles or overlapping tiles can increase the vulnerability of your home to wildfire. Make sure to block them and repair as needed. Consult the Living With Fire Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below for more information.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Space between roofing materials increases the vulnerability of your home during a wildfire. Be sure to block them. Consult the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide below for more info.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Illustration of the eaves of a home before and after installing soffetts with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of the eaves of a home before and after installing soffits with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Enclose eaves with soffits.”

Facebook: The area under the roof overhang of a house, also known as eaves, provides an entry point for burning embers if nearby debris or other materials are burning. Lower the risk of fire by installing soffits to close off. Learn more in the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide from Living with Fire linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: The area under the roof overhang of a house provides an entry point for burning embers if nearby debris is burning. Install soffits to reduce the vulnerability of this area. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

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Illustration of a deck attached to a house with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of a deck attached to a house with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Retrofitting decks.”

Facebook: Most deck boards are combustible. Replace the deck boards closest to your home using a non-combustible material and use a metal flashing where the deck meets the home at least 6 inches in height. Refer to the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below for more information.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening#NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Most deck boards are combustible. Replace the deck boards closest to your home with a non-combustible material and use a 6-inch metal flashing where the deck meets the home. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Illustration of the area under the deck of a home with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of the area under the deck of a home with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Create an ember resistant zone under, and around decks.”

Facebook: One way to reduce your home’s vulnerability to wildfire, is to create an ember-resistant zone under and around the footprint of a deck. This will reduce the likelihood of under-deck flame exposure. Refer to the Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide linked below to learn more about preparing your home for wildfire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening#NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Reduce the possibility of under-deck flame exposure near your home by creating an ember-resistant zone under and around your deck. Learn more in the guide below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire

https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Illustration of a fence with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of a fence with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Don’t use fence as a trellis to grow plants.”

Facebook: It’s recommended to not use your fence as a trellis. Dead vegetation can accumulate on the fence which provides kindling for embers. Plants can trap embers and ignite in flames, passing them onto the fence and onto a house. Learn more about preparing your property for wildfire in our Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening#NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: It’s recommended to not use your fence as a trellis. Dead vegetation can accumulate on the fence which provides kindling for embers. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

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Illustration of a fence with text that says,

Alt-text: Illustration of a fence with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Replace the section of fence closest to home with a non-combustible material.

Facebook: Reduce the risk of wildfire by replacing the piece of fence that attaches to your home with a non-combustible material. This section should be at least 5-feet long. Consult our Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide below to learn more about hardening your home to withstand wildfire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Reduce the risk of wildfire and replace the section of fence nearest to your home with a non-combustible material. Learn more about hardening your home to withstand wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf


Photo of the base of a fence with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of the base of a fence with text that says, “Harden your home to withstand wildfire. Remove debris from base of fence.”

Facebook: Fencing can provide a direct path to a home if surrounding vegetation or embers ignite it. Reduce the risk of your fence catching fire by routinely removing dead vegetation and other debris nearby. Learn more in our Wildfire Home Retrofit Guide below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

Twitter: Fencing creates a path to a home if embers ignite it. Reduce the risk of your fence catching fire by routinely removing dead vegetation and other debris nearby. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #HomeHardening #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/pms/pubs/2020-3810.pdf

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September is National Preparedness Month

According to ready.gov, “National Preparedness Month (NPM) is recognized each September to promote family and community disaster planning now and throughout the year. As our nation continues to respond to COVID-19, there is no better time to be involved this September.”

As a part of National Preparedness Month, the Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign has prepared wildfire preparedness posts below.


Photo of a Wildfire Evacuation Checklist with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a Wildfire Evacuation Checklist with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Evacuation checklist.”

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month, and we recommend preparing now for wildfire evacuation by packing a go-bag and using our evacuation checklist. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #Preparedness #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2007_90.pdf

Twitter: September is National Preparedness Month, and we encourage all Nevadans to prepare now for wildfire evacuation by packing a go-bag and using our evacuation checklist. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2007_90.pdf


Photo of a red evacuation go bag with text that says, Prepare for Wildfire, Pack an evacuation go-bag.

Alt-text: Photo of a red evacuation go bag with text that says, Prepare for Wildfire, Pack an evacuation go-bag.”

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing for wildfire by packing a go-bag. A go-bag should be easily accessible and filled with the items you need to quickly and safely evacuate your home. It needs to have enough supplies to last at least three days but should have enough to last seven days. Find out what goes into a go-bag and how to put one together in our “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #Preparedness #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf

Twitter: A go-bag is easily accessible and helps you quickly and safely evacuate during a wildfire. Learn how to put one together in our “Fire Adapted Communities Guide” linked below.

#LivingWithFire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf


Photo of a person signing up for code red notifications on their cell phone with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a person signing up for code red notifications on their cell phone with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire, Sign-up for emergency notifications.”

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing for wildfire by signing up for emergency notifications. Emergency notifications keep you updated in the face of disaster. Sign up for emergency notifications and regional alerts, like the CodeRED system, with your local authorities. Click the link below to learn about emergency notifications in Nevada.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafe
https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=3336

Twitter: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing for wildfire by signing up for emergency notifications. Click the link below to sign up in Nevada.

#LivingWithFire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=3336

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September is National Preparedness Month

According to ready.gov, “National Preparedness Month (NPM) is recognized each September to promote family and community disaster planning now and throughout the year. As our nation continues to respond to COVID-19, there is no better time to be involved this September.”

As a part of National Preparedness Month, the Nevada Wildfire Awareness Campaign has prepared wildfire preparedness posts below.


Photo of a dog in a car with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a dog in a car with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Animal evacuation.”

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing your animals for wildfire.

Many people living in high fire hazard areas have pets and livestock. Prepare to evacuate your animals before wildfire happens. Pack a go-bag with everything your animals might need and make sure that you can safely transport them. Consult our guide “Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness” to learn more.

#LivingWithFire #ReadyForWildfire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf

Twitter: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing to evacuate your animals before wildfire happens. Learn more about evacuation below.

#LivingWithFire #ReadyForWildfire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://naes.agnt.unr.edu/PMS/Pubs/1510_2011_93.pdf


Photo of a person in a wheelchair with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a person in a wheelchair with text that says, “Prepare for Wildfire. Evacuating vulnerable populations.”

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing to help those in your community who need special consideration during emergencies like a wildfire evacuation. Learn more below:

  • Contact your local emergency manager to learn about emergency services for individuals with disabilities.
  • Create a support network of people who can assist with evacuation.
  • Pack a go-bag with 3-5 days’ worth of essentials including medications and medical equipment.

#LivingWithFire #ReadyForWildfire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

Twitter: September is National Preparedness Month. Help prepare those in your community who need special consideration during emergencies like a wildfire evacuation. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/


Infographic explaining what a red flag warning is and how to act when one is in place, in order to prevent wildfires. More information in description below.

Facebook: September is National Preparedness Month and we recommend preparing for critical fire weather conditions that increase the risk of a wildfire and can lead to a Red Flag Warning.

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are happening. Weather conditions can consist of strong winds, low humidity, warm temperatures, or a combination of such. All can contribute to extreme fire behavior. Be aware of the fire warnings in your area and always follow the instructions provided by local emergency officials. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ReadyForWildfire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fire2/main.php

Twitter: September is National Preparedness Month. Prepare for critical fire weather conditions that can lead to a Red Flag Warning. Follow all instructions given by local emergency officials.

#LivingWithFire #PreparednessMonth #NWAC #Wildfire
https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fire2/main.php

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Photo of a tree that has been scorched by fire with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a tree that has been scorched by fire with text that says, “After the fire. Tree care after a fire.”

Facebook: Many trees can recover after a fire. Water them as quickly as possible afterward and check on them weekly to make sure they are absorbing enough of it. Lastly, prune off dead, broken, and heavily burned limbs. Learn more about taking care of your trees after wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/31I23iA

Twitter: Many trees can recover after a fire. Water them, check on them weekly and prune off any dead, broken, or burned limbs. Learn more about taking care of your trees after wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/31I23iA


Photo of a stand of dead trees with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a stand of dead trees with text that says, ” After the fire. Wat to plant after tree loss.”

Facebook: Trees are an important part of many ecosystems. Dead trees should be removed to reduce the risk of spreading wildfire and should new trees should be planted. Try to replant the same type of tree. For more on how and why you should replant trees, consult the guide linked below.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://www.livingwithfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/What-to-Plant-After-Tree-Loss-1-accessible.pdf

Twitter: Dead trees should be removed, and new ones planted, to reduce the risk of wildfire. Learn more about what trees to plant below.

#LivingWithFire #DefensibleSpace #NWAC
https://www.livingwithfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/What-to-Plant-After-Tree-Loss-1-accessible.pdf


Facebook: Erosion almost always follows wildfire. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to control postfire erosion. Consult the guide below for information on soil erosion and other ways to recover after a wildfire.
#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety
https://bit.ly/3ueKG56

Twitter: Erosion almost always follows wildfire. There are steps you can take to control postfire erosion. Consult the guide below for information on soil erosion and landscape recovery after a wildfire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #DefensibleSpace #NWAC #Wildfire
https://bit.ly/3ueKG56

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Photo of a wildfire burning on a hill behind a neighborhoos with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a wildfire burning on a hill behind a neighborhood with text that says, “After the fire. Returning to communities after a wildfire.”

Facebook: If your community has been evacuated during a wildfire, do not return until permitted by law enforcement officials. Before you enter your home, check for remaining hazards in and around your property such as burning embers, unstable power lines, and large pits of ash left from burned trees. Take notes and photos of all damaged property and belongings to report them to your insurance company. Learn more at www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep

Twitter: After a wildfire, take care before returning home: check for hazards like burning embers, and document any damage to your property for insurance. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/


Photo of a house surrounded by a burned landscape with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a house surrounded by a burned landscape with text that says, “After the fire. Returning home after a wildfire.”

Facebook: After a wildfire evacuation, do not return to your home until re-entry is permitted by law enforcement officials. When you enter your home, check your attic and crawl space each day, for several days. Check for smoke from embers that may have entered the home and could still smolder and ignite the home from within. Make a list and take photos of any damage. Do not eat food or take medications that have been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot. Learn more about recovering after a wildfire below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/

Twitter: After an evacuation, don’t return home until permitted by local officials. Then, check for burning embers that may be hiding in attics and crawl spaces, and document any damage caused by fire. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC
https://www.livingwithfire.com/get-prepared/


Photo of a burned landscape with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a burned landscape with text that says, “After the fire. What grows back after the fire?”

Facebook: Plants vary in their response to wildfire. Fire kills some plants, rejuvenates others, and some plants require fire to exist. After a wildfire, the resulting barren and burned landscape might not stay that way for long. Learn more about what grows back after a fire at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3tCKL2s

Twitter: Plants vary in their response to wildfire. It kills some plants, rejuvenates others, and some plants require fire to exist. Learn more about what grows back after fire below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3tCKL2s

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Photo of a tractor on a burned landscape with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a tractor on a burned landscape with text that says, “After the fire. Rehabilitation after a fire.”

Facebook: Some wildfires cause damage that requires special attention to prevent future problems. Rehabilitation and reforestation are long-term processes that focus on repairing damaged natural resources. This includes planting trees, reestablishing native species, restoring habitats and treating invasive plants. Learn more about rehabilitation after a fire at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3tCClIN

Twitter: Rehabilitation after a wildfire is done to repair damaged natural resources. It includes planting trees, restoring habitats, and reestablishing native species. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3tCClIN


Facebook: Individuals living in and around areas impacted by wildfire face an increased risk of flooding up to five years after. Learn more about the impact wildfire has on its surrounding area at the link below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3gigtyu

Twitter: Individuals living in areas impacted by wildfire face an increased risk of flooding up to 5 years after. Learn more about the impact wildfire has on nearby areas below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep
https://bit.ly/3gigtyu

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October 3-9, 2021 is Fire Prevention Week

For Fire Prevention Week, we have included some wildfire prevention messages below.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week visit: https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Staying-safe/Preparedness/Fire-Prevention-Week/About


Photo of a cars on a highway in the distance and grass in the foregroud with text that says,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Photo of cars on a highway in the distance and grass in the foreground with text that says, “Unsecured trailer chains spark wildfires.One less community at risk. One less spark, one less wildfire.”

Facebook: Motorists are responsible for many of the wildfires sparked along the roadways. Nearly all of these fires could be prevented by following these safety rules. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

  • Secure safety chains on all towing equipment.
  • Use appropriate safety pins and hitchball to secure chains.
  • Ensure your vehicle is properly maintained:
    • Proper tire pressure can prevent a blowout, exposed wheel rims will throw sparks.
    • Properly maintain brakes, brakes worn too thin can cause metal to metal contact which can cause sparks.
    • Get regular tune-ups to prevent a clogged exhaust system which can launch hot particles into vegetation.
  • Avoid parking or driving in dry grass and brush. Hot exhaust pipes and mufflers can start a fire.

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Motorists are responsible for many of the wildfires sparked along the roadways. Nearly all of these fires could be prevented by following safety rules. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Photo of a cow sitting in a field with the text,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Photo of a cow sitting in a field with the text, “One less habitat loss. Extinguish your campfire completely” and photos illustrating how to drown the campfire, stir it and feel for heat.

Facebook: Campfires that aren’t properly maintained and extinguished can cause wildfires. Be responsible for your campfire. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

  • Never leave your campfire unattended.
  • Always keep a shovel and bucket nearby.
  • When extinguishing your campfire, use the drown, stir, feel method: drown the fire with water and stir around the fire area with your shovel to wet any remaining embers and ash. Shovel dirt onto the campfire site and mix and smother thoroughly. Feel the area with the back of your hand to make sure all the heat is out. Repeat this process until you are sure there is no more heat left

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Campfires that aren’t properly maintained and extinguished can cause wildfires. Be responsible for your campfire. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety


Infographic of a shooting target on fire with the text,

Photo Credit: Nevada Fire Info

Alt-text: Infographic of a shooting target on fire with the text, “Take Aim, Prevent Wildfires.” Other text in the description below.

Facebook: Careless shooting can cause fires. If it’s dry, hot and windy; save your ammo.

  • Avoid shooting into rocks or metal objects and place targets in areas that are free of vegetation.
  • Always have water, a shovel and a fire extinguisher ready in case a fire starts.
  • Clean up all your targets and shells when you’re finished shooting and pack them out.
  • Exploding targets, incendiary rounds and tracer ammunition are illegal on all public lands. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

Twitter: Careless shooting can cause fires. If it’s dry, hot and windy; save your ammo. Learn more at www.nevadafireinfo.org/prevention

#LivingWithFire #FireYear #FirePrevention #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #FireSafety

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Photo of a prescribed pile burn with text that says,

Photo Credit: North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District

Alt-text: Photo of a prescribed pile burn with text that says, “Prescribe Fire. Restoring resilient landscapes.”

Facebook: Healthy and resilient landscapes are less vulnerable to extreme wildfires because they can adapt to climate change, and are more resistant to invasive species and insect infestations. After years of fire exclusion and drought, agencies are working to restore the health of ecosystems, and reduce the wildfire risk to habitats and communities. Introducing prescribed fire is a tool to help restore resilient landscapes. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep  #GoodFire
https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/fire/resilient-landscapes

Twitter: Agencies are working to restore the health of ecosystems by thinning crowded forests and using prescribed fire. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep  #GoodFire
https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/fire/resilient-landscapes


Photo of a firefighter igniting vegetation using a driptorch with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a firefighter igniting vegetation using a drip torch with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Reducing hazardous fuels.”

Facebook: There is such a thing as good fire. Many ecosystems have become unhealthy after years of fire exclusion and can become overgrown with vegetation which can become a fire hazard. Under specific and controlled conditions, prescribed burning can help restore ecosystems while also reducing hazardous fuels and mitigating the risk of wildfire to communities. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep  #GoodFire
https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/prescribed-fire

Twitter: Prescribed burning can help restore ecosystems while also reducing hazardous fuels and reducing the risk of wildfire to communities. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep  #GoodFire
https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/prescribed-fire

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Photo of fire professionals in a group with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of fire professionals in a group with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Making a plan for controlled burning.”

Facebook: Prescribed fire is regulated by states, carefully planned by qualified experts, and carried out under specific weather conditions. Click the link below to learn more about pre-burn considerations for prescribed fire.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #GoodFire
https://ucanr.edu/sites/Mariposa/files/321632.pdf

Twitter: Prescribed fire is regulated by states, carefully planned by qualified experts, and carried out under specific weather conditions. Click the link below to learn more.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #GoodFire
http://forestry.nv.gov/forestry-resources/controlled-burns/


Photo of a forest floor smoldering with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a forest floor smoldering with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Revitalizing soils.”

Facebook: Fire can drastically alter soils, which are vital to the health of any ecosystem. One of the key services soils provide in ecosystems is to filter toxins and recycle nutrients. Prescribed fires, which by design, are less severe than wildfires, have less impact on soil health and can actually improve soil fertility. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #GoodFire
https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/pnw_gtr759.pdf

Twitter: Fire can drastically alter soils. Prescribed fires, which are less severe by design have less impact on soil health and can actually improve the fertility of soils. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #GoodFire
https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/pnw_gtr759.pdf


Photo of a low intensity fire with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a low-intensity fire with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Promoting plant diversity.”

Facebook: Some plants depend on fire to thrive. In these fire-adapted areas, fire promotes plant and wildlife diversity and removes dead and living vegetation that can accumulate, altering the ecosystem and creating a fire hazard. Under specific, controlled conditions, fire managers use prescribed fire to recreate the beneficial effects of natural fire, while reducing the buildup of hazardous vegetation. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #GoodFire
https://smokeybear.com/en/about-wildland-fire/benefits-of-fire

Twitter: Some plant life relies on fire to thrive. Prescribed fire can recreate the beneficial effects of natural fire while reducing the buildup of hazardous vegetation. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #NWAC #GoodFire
https://smokeybear.com/en/about-wildland-fire/benefits-of-fire

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Photo of wildfire smoke with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of wildfire smoke with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Prescribed fire smoke information.”

Facebook: Like all fire, prescribed fire leads to smoke. However, prescribed fires are planned carefully to keep smoke at acceptable levels. Occasionally, smoke from prescribed fire can accumulate in a community, but usually only for a few hours, as opposed to smoke exposure from uncontrolled wildfires which typically last longer, resulting in harmful air quality. Check with local officials for burning schedules so you can be prepared. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #GoodFire
https://ndep.nv.gov/air/air-pollutants/smoke-management

Twitter: Like all fire, prescribed fire and pile burning leads to smoke. However, prescribed fires are planned carefully to keep smoke at acceptable levels. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #GoodFire
https://ndep.nv.gov/air/air-pollutants/smoke-management


Photo of a pile of vegetation burning with text that says,

Alt-text: Photo of a pile of vegetation burning with text that says, “Prescribed fire. Open pile burning information.”

Facebook: When maintaining or creating defensible space, it’s easy to accumulate a large amount of “green waste” consisting of leaves, weeds, branches, and shrubs that need disposing of. In some areas, open pile burning is one method of disposal. Open pile burning requires a permit from your local fire agency and is typically only allowed during the Spring and Fall, on days when the air quality is good, and the risk of a controlled fire escaping is low. Learn more below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #Wildfire #FirePrep #GoodFire
https://www.livingwithfire.com/defensible-space/the-ins-and-outs-of-open-pile-burning/

Twitter: Pile burning is a useful method for destroying fuels that spread wildfire. Learn more about the process, when it should be used, below.

#LivingWithFire #ResilientLandscapes #NWAC #GoodFire

The Ins and Outs of Open Pile Burning

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